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GCP Nepal welcomes two Nepali students in fall

Shelby DeHaven, ‘Doah Staff Writer
April 24, 2013

'Doah photo courtesy of Alisa Daum From left to right: Nepali student Kriti, SU President Tracy Fitzsimmons, Nepali student Sapana and GCP Nepal trip leader Ann Denkler.

‘Doah photo courtesy of Alisa Daum
From left to right: Nepali student Kriti, SU President Tracy Fitzsimmons, Nepali student Sapana and GCP Nepal trip leader Ann Denkler.

The Global Citizenship Project is about more than a group of Shenandoah University students, staff and professors having an experience of a lifetime, it is also about giving back to the country they visit. This year a trip to Nepal changed the lives of 11 members of the S.U. community and next year, a trip to the U.S. and Shenandoah will change the lives of two female students from Nepal.

S.U., in conjunction with the Little Sisters Fund, which is an organization that helps Nepali females receive an education, is funding two Nepali girls who will be attending school here starting in the fall.

Sapana and Kriti are both extraordinarily bright and are among the top one percent of their country, explains President Tracy Fitzsimmons. Attending school here is a great opportunity for them.

However, these girls face many challenges. Alisa Daum, a member of the GCP Nepal trip, explains that when these girls arrive in August, “they will have nothing more than a suitcase with a few clothes and some personal belongings.”

She goes on to explain that as a group, the students who visited Nepal are working on collecting items like dorm supplies, clothes and school supplies for Sapana and Kriti, as well as planning to be there for them to help them transition to life in the United States.

“The students are really taking the lead in arranging to supply the girls with what they’ll need for college,” states trip leader, Ann Denkler. “They will make sure the girls will be happy and comfortable.”

Nepal changed the way the GCP students look at the relationships Americans have with each other. Daum explains that, “The Nepali people frequently called us friend, or sister or brother, and each time they would introduce one of their friends or family members they would speak so highly of that person that you instantly wanted to get to know them and hear their story.” In contrast, she views the U.S. as a more “individualistic and compartmentalized culture.” When the two Nepali students arrive, the GCP Nepal students hope to show them a more connected and welcoming version of the U.S.

If you want to help the GCP Nepal group with monetary, physical or time donations, contact Daum at adaum12@su.edu, or any member of the GCP group.

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